Tokyo Marui spring powered replicas – Part 2

SG Polizei P228

Here we can see the box and instruction manual.

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This is the left side.

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And the right side.

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Real Steel Background

The SIG P228 is the compact version of the P226; it is a 9x19mm pistol using a 13 round magazine and has a shorter barrel and forged carbon steel slide. It has some use with the US military as well as with various law enforcement agencies. It should also be noted that the P226 was entered in the 1984 competition for the 1911 replacement.

In the P226 series, a “squarish” enlarged breech section of the barrel locks into the ejection port to keep together barrel and slide instead of lugs and recesses milled like in the Browning type of design.

Visual Accuracy

The Tokyo Marui SG Polizei P228 is a good replica of the shape and contours of the SIG P228 but it lacks any trademarks or Sig markings.

For Functional Accuracy, Shooting and Quality and reliability and Overall Impression, what I wrote for the Ruger P85 in Part 1 would also apply to the SG Polizei P228.

Glock 17

Here we can see the box and instruction manual.

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This is the left side.

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And the right side.

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Real Steel Background

The Glock 17 became the service side arm for the Austrian Police and Military in early 80s. Designed by Gaston Glock (who had a lot of experience in advance synthetic polymer but none in firearms design or manufacture), the Glock 17 represented a drastically new approach in pistol manufacturing.

Being lighter due to its plastic frame, the Glock 17 is able to pack 17 rounds of 9x19mm ammunition and still keep a reasonable weight. The Glock 17 uses a stricker firing mechanism instead of a hammer. The firing pin goes to a half cocked position when the pistol is charged and it is only when the trigger is pulled that it is fully cocked. This is one of the safety features and there is also the characteristic safety lever located on the trigger blade and there is, lastly, a drop safety which will prevent the gun of firing if it is dropped or jarred.

It should be noted that the barrel has polygonal rifling instead of conventional lands and grooves. Because the barrel axis is kept close to the shooter’s hand by a low slide profile the muzzle rise is reduced, which in turn help with faster aim recovery for the following shots.

The slide has a Tenifer process applied to it. This finish is hard and also offers excellent resistance to salt water corrosion. The Glock 17 has about only 34 parts assembled in five main groups: frame, barrel, recoil spring assembly, slide and magazine.

Visual Accuracy

The Tokyo Marui Glock 17 has all the trademarks and is an excellent replica of the actual firearm.

Functional Accuracy

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 in Part 1 would also apply to the Glock 17 but in this case it should be noted that it is a bit of a disappointment that the ejection port is part of the slide (it doesn’t open like on the other models).

On the good side, the lever on the trigger blade does its safety function and pressure should be applied to it in order to pull the trigger.

Shooting

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 in Part 1 would also apply to the Glock 17.

Quality and reliability

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 would also apply to the Glock 17 with the exception that a small internal part broke. It doesn’t prevent it from working correctly but it was one of the incentives that made me put to rest all my Tokyo Marui airsofts.

Overall Impression

Personally I still like very much all the Tokyo Marui spring replicas that I own. The Glock 17 has a special place in my collection and it is still looking good.

HK P7M13

Here we can see the box and instruction manual.

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This is the left side.

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And the right side.

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Real Steel Background

The P7 series of ambidextrous 9x19mm pistols weighing less than 1000g were safe to carry with a loaded chamber meaning that they were ready to fire instantly. Production of the P7 was started in 1979 and they were used to equip some German Police and Military units.

The P7 series has a fixed barrel and the absence of locking system makes it simpler to manufacture. It uses a gas delayed blowback locking system which keeps the breech closed until pressure is lower.

The P7M13 is the 13 rounds version and has a double stacked magazine. The pistol has a recognizable silhouette due to the built-in cocking lever located at the front of the grip. This lever acts as a safety because the gun cannot be fired if the lever is not squeezed.

With the lever depressed the pistol fires as any other semi-autos but as soon as it is released the firearm is decocked. This means that the P7 is safe to be carried with a round chambered.

It should be noted that, like the Glock 17, it also has a polygonal rifled barrel.

Visual Accuracy

The Tokyo Marui HK P7M13 has all trademarks and is an excellent replica of the actual firearm.

Functional Accuracy

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 in Part 1 would also apply to the HK P7M13, furthermore the built-in cocking lever located at the front of the grip gives it its characteristic silhouette and is moveable (it has been so long that I cannot remember if it will prevent firing if it is not squeezed but I assume it does). For sure, the lever won’t cock the gun and the slide needs to be racked back.

Shooting

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 would also apply to the P7M13. To be honest I have to say that, for some reasons, the P7M13 and the Walther P38 have been rarely shot compared to the other models.

It might be that they were bought separately after the others and as I was used to the shooting characteristics of the first ones, those two models were, more or less, directly placed in storage.

Quality and reliability

As it has not been shot as much as the other, I cannot confirm performance of the P7M13 but based on the Tokyo Marui quality I would assume that it would be on par.

Overall Impression

Personally I still like very much all the Tokyo Marui spring replicas that I own. The P7M13 is an interesting firearm and this replica has a special place in my collection.

Walther P38

Here we can see the box and instruction manual.

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This is the left side.

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And the right side.

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Real Steel Background

The P38 was the first weapon to combine a double action/single action with a locked breech system into a pistol. With the decocking lever a shooter could safely chamber a round and lower the hammer to carry the handgun loaded. Upon firing, the delayed unlocking of the slide is made by a falling wedge system placed under the breech.  The P38 is a 9x19mm weapon with a single stack 8 rounds magazine.

Manufacture started in 1939 and over the course of WWII approximately 1.2 million P38 were produced. The three factories were Walther, Mauser and Spreewerk but the names were replaced by codes stamped on the pistols to prevent Allied Forces of trying to destroy them.

Visual Accuracy

Unfortunately the Tokyo Marui HK Walther P38 is disappointing when compared with the other models reviewed. Being a WWII model I would have expected more markings and proof marks on this replica of a historical firearm. As I don’t use it regularly, I left the warning tag on the right side and it doesn’t help with the realism.

Functional Accuracy

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 in Part 1 would also apply to the Walther P38.

Shooting

What I wrote for the Ruger P85 in Part 1 would generally apply to the Walther P38 but it doesn’t seem to be as accurate as the first models I acquired. I think that this model doesn’t have the Hop Up system. To be honest I have to say that, for some reason, the P7M13 and the Walther P38 have been rarely shot compared to the others.

It might be that they were bought separately after the others and as I was used to the shooting characteristics of the first ones, those two models were, more or less, directly placed in storage.

Quality and reliability

As it has not been shot as much as the other I cannot confirm performance of the Walther P38 but based on the Tokyo Marui quality I was a bit disappointed that it was not on par. The lanyard ring is a flimsy part on that model and after it was broken I made a brass replacement.

Overall Impression

Personally I still like very much all the Tokyo Marui spring replicas that I own, but the Walther P38 is the weakest replica of the lot. It still deserves a spot in my collection because it represents an important firearm of the past.

Please note that, with the exception of the Glock 17, these models are still produced in Japan. I probably mentioned earlier in the text but it might be worthwhile to mention it again.

Pros and Cons of the Tokyo Marui Spring Powered Replicas

Pros:

  • Except for the Walther P38 which is not on par with the others, all the models are visually convincing replicas of the firearms they are depicting.
  • All of the spring powered replicas are very inexpensive to shoot. The only cost other than the purchase of the pistols is the cost of a bag of quality 0.20g 6mm plastic BBs. I know that there is a warning to not re-use the spent ammunition but, since I am shooting only at paper target with a thick piece of clothing as a backstop, they were fired again and again (in short, a lot of time) before being finally discarded.
  • They are also fairly good examples of some mechanical systems (Browning tilting barrel (Ruger P85,CZ75, SIG228, Glock 17) , fixed barrel (HK P7M13), rotating breech locking system (Beretta M8000), trigger safety (Glock 17).

Cons:

  • The weight of the all plastic replicas spoils the realism when they are handled.
  • Since they are spring pistols that need to be recocked for each shot, a realistic experience should not be expected either.
  • Some of the controls are not working and the slide cannot be locked open, preventing them to be used as firearm safety training aids.
  • The selling price of those replicas in Canada was fairly high. When comparing, after currency conversion, the price in yen (as shown in the small catalogue accompanying the instruction manual) to the Canadian dollars paid at the store, it was in the order of 1 to 5. This meant, at the time, it would cost about $20 in Japan but I paid $100 in Canada.
  • Accuracy is lower than conventional airguns but this is to be expected and in some ways could be overcome by using a properly sized target.

I am planning a second installment to show what happened with replicas after the law of 1998 was passed in Canada.

I hope you enjoyed this article.

R-Gun Pete

Related Pages:

Tokyo Marui spring powered replicas – Part 1

Classic Handguns: The Glock 17

Home

6mm reviews

 

Tags: Tokyo, marui, spring, replica, air, pistol, heckler, Koch, walther, sig, glock

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